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57 Ways To Protect Your Home Environment (and Yourself)
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14. Use Pest Barriers In Your Garden

plant cover

A variety of pest barriers are available for use in the yard and garden as alternatives to pesticides.

Plant covers were marketed originally as devices that heat the soil and make earlier planting possible. But these covers have a nice bonus: used when crops are small, they keep insects away from the plants.

plant cover diagram

To create your own plant covers, attach muslin to a wooden or wire frame and set it over the plants. In addition to muslin, other good materials are vented polyethylene, spun- bonded polyester, point-bonded polypropylene, and woven plastics.
slugs

Another pest barrier is copper sheeting. Place 6-inch-wide copper sheeting at least 2 inches into the soil around valuable plantings. This barrier is quite expensive, but it effectively blocks the invasion of slugs.
Pictured is a sticky trap used for white flies, aphids, and fungus gnats.

Various sticky barriers and trapping adhesives are available commercially. By attaching or applying them around trunks or trees, you can create a barrier for canker worms and protect individual trees from defoliation by these particular pests.
screen cone

To keep cabbage maggots from attacking the roots of cabbage and other related vegetables, create a screen cone from ordinary window screening. Shape the screening into a cone, attach it to a piece of wood, and place it over the plant. This barrier excludes the flies that lay the eggs from which cabbage maggots hatch.
protect plants from cabbage maggots by encircling the young plant with a 3-inch-diameter disk of tar paper, foam rubber, or other study material.

You can also protect plants from cabbage maggots by encircling the young plant with a 3-inch-diameter disk of tar paper, foam rubber, or other study material. It works in a manner similar to that of screen cones.
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